General Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability + Cities and Towns + Coastal systems and low-lying areas + Commercial Services + Ecosystems & Species + Food, fiber and forest products + Freshwater resources + Industry + National Security + Utilities and Infrastructure

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Statement on the Re-election of President Obama

WWF congratulates President Obama on his re-election and looks forward to working with him and his administration over the next four years to tackle the greatest threats to our planet, and the people and other creatures that call it home.  An agenda focused on common-sense solutions to prepare for present and future climate impacts, while transitioning our economy to clean, renewable energy will command support across the political spectrum. At the same time, President Obama now has the political space to put international efforts to secure a global climate treaty back on the right track.
 

Disaster resilience in America

Event Date: 
Friday, November 30, 2012 - 9:00am - 12:30pm
Event Location: 
Washington, DC

Building upon the recent National Academies report Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative, a series of National Research Council panel discussions featuring nationally recognized experts in disaster resilience will launch a national conversation that translates to resilience-building actions at the community, state, and national levels. 

Hurricane Sandy is 11th Billion Dollar Weather-Extreme for U.S. in 2012, as Americans see 2nd Most Disastrous Year on Record

With two months still left in 2012, the preliminary data indicate that the U.S. has thus far experienced eleven weather-related disasters each with damages of at least a billion dollars. Since 1980, only 2011 saw more billion-dollar weather disasters (14 in all). With the drought and Hurricane Sandy likely to be among the costliest weather-related disasters on record (i.e. since 1980), 2012 also is likely to edge out 1988 as the second costliest year in terms of billion-dollar weather-extremes.

Video (PBS): How Cities Should Prepare for Climate Disruption and Sea Level Rise

Should cities be preparing for the consequences of climate disruption and rising sea levels?  As part of the PBS Newshour series on "Coping With Climate Change," Ray Suarez discusses the question with Joseph Romm of Center for American Progress and American Enterprise Institute's Kenneth Green.

Sandy's Wake-up Call: The Future Is Here Early

For the 50 million of us who stood in the path of Hurricane Sandy and the rest who watched its devastation, isn't it time to ask our leaders how we can avoid a future where Frankenstorms like Sandy become the new normal?  We need common-sense strategies to prepare our communities to withstand a future with rising seas and with storms, droughts and wildfires on steroids.  We also must quickly harness American ingenuity to build a world powered by carbon-free energy that will stop pumping steroids into our climate system and lessen future risks.  We must do both and Sandy has reminded us that there's no time to lose. The future is here, a little early.

In Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Group Issues Report Saying Observed Climate Change Impacts "Have Little National Significance"

In 2009, a publicly funded assessment of the impacts of climate change, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, warned in its key findings that "coastal areas are at increasing risk from sea-level rise and storm surge." Now, just days after "Frankenstorm" Sandy pushed the most destructive and costly storm surge on record for the U.S. mid-Atlantic into the region's heavily populated coastal areas, the libertarian Cato Institute is treating Americans to a Halloween trick. It released today (31 October 2012) a slick study masquerading as an updated "Addendum" to the Federal report. In its key findings, Cato entirely drops any mention of storm surges and says the "[i]mpacts of observed climate change have little national significance."

Great Lakes Climate Symposium 2012

Event Date: 
Tuesday, October 30, 2012 (All day)
Event Location: 
Ann Arbor, MI

Learn about the latest research on climate change in the Great Lakes region from a team of researchers that contributed a set of white papers on Midwest climate impacts to the Federal government's National Climate Assessment.

Federal Report: Rising Seas and Climate Change Threaten Coasts, as Local Governments Shoulder Much of the Preparedness Burden

A new report on climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability in coastal areas of the U.S. warns that coping with sea level rise and coastal disruption "will be a challenge for coastal economies that contributed $8.3 trillion to the GDP in 2011." It says that local governments will have to shoulder much of the burden of "making the critical, basic land-use and public investment decisions and ...working with community stakeholder groups to implement adaptive measures on the ground."

13th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Disasters and Environment -- Science, Preparedness, and Resilience

Event Date: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, January 17, 2013 (All day)
Event Location: 
Washington, DC

"On January 15-17, 2013, join over 1,200 leaders from the emergency response, scientific, policy, conservation, and business communities, as well as federal and local government officials, to address themes such as cascading disasters, the intersection of the built and natural environments, disasters as mechanisms of ecosystem change, rethinking recovery and expanding the vision of mitigation, human behavior and its consequences and "No Regrets" resilience."

Video: From Rooftop to Alleyway, Chicago Fights Extreme Urban Heat With Greener Ideas

As the planet warms, heat waves are becoming more frequent and severe.  The problem is compounded in cities by the "urban heat island" effect -- the tendency for cities to be much warmer than the surrounding countryside.  In this 10 minute video, PBS Newshour reports on Chicago's efforts to cool the city down and dampen the rising need for air conditioning.  

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