General Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability + Cities and Towns + Coastal systems and low-lying areas + Commercial Services + Ecosystems & Species + Food, fiber and forest products + Freshwater resources + Industry + National Security + Utilities and Infrastructure

The Greatest American (Climate) Heroes

Quick, without thinking about it, answer this question: What's the most important thing that's happened in America on climate change over the past year? The tragedy of Superstorm Sandy? President Obama's State of the Union address? Sixty percent of America in the grip of a devastating drought? All fair answers. But here's mine: The leadership of American cities.

Obama Highlights Emerging Impacts of Climate Change, Calls for Energy Transformation and for Community Climate Preparedness

In his State of the Union address last night (12 February 2013), President Obama said that "for the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change."  He pledged to "come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy."  He said that "if Congress won’t act soon to protect future generations, I will." Lou Leonard, WWF’s head of climate change, responded: "It was encouraging to see President Obama connect the dots between extreme weather and dirty energy, and to be clear that he won't wait for Congress to act.  Cities and towns on the front lines of extreme weather can't afford more excuses from Washington."

Chicago, Cincinnati, San Francisco Recognized for Citywide Efforts to Address Climate Change

Chicago, Cincinnati and San Francisco have been selected as U.S. finalists in World Wildlife Fund’s Earth Hour City Challenge, a year-long challenge rewarding cities that are preparing for increasingly extreme weather and promoting renewable energy. Both Chicago and Cincinnati experienced their warmest years on record in 2012.  

2012: The Year Climate Change Got Real for Americans (Video)

In the latest in his “Climate Denial Crock of the Week" video series, Peter Sinclair provides an overview of the climate extremes in 2012 that battered the U.S.  The conditions have helped shift public opinion and elevate the public debate around climate change. 

With High Hopes for the Future: Obama's Moral Imperative to Address Climate Change

"I wager," says WWF President and CEO Carter Roberts in this Huffington Post piece, "that like Lincoln, President Obama will be remembered most for what he does to address the existential threat that history has presented on his watch: the breakdown of our planet's natural systems upon which all life depends, and specifically human-caused climate change."

Talkin' on Turkey Day: A Thanksgiving Climate Pledge

We think of Thanksgiving as an eating holiday, but it really is a "talking holiday" when we slow down and spend the day in conversation.  When the conversation turns to the weather, consider talking about our changing weather patterns and the consequences we are feeling and hearing about.   What if we then spent a little time speaking with each other about steps we can take to prepare for those impacts, and to avoid more serious climate disruption in the future?   If we can pledge to talk turkey with friends and family around the table, we are one step closer to a national conversation about climate change -- and to enduring solutions.

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminar with Katharine Hayhoe: The Facts are Not Enough –Overcoming Public Deadlock on Climate Change

Event Date: 
Thursday, December 13, 2012 (All day)
Event Location: 
WWF, 1250 24th St NW, Washington, D.C

Mounting scientific evidence documents the emerging consequences and future risks of climate change for the United States. As the scientific evidence builds, however, public opinion in the U.S. remains sharply divided. Much of the disagreement comes from political and religious conservatives. Why is climate change so polarizing to these communities? What makes it so hard to comprehend and accept? Join  Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, Director of the Climate Science Center and Associate Professor at Texas Tech University in a seminar where she will identify common barriers to accepting the reality of climate change and explore ways to move past these obstacles towards action.

Tracking Pacific Walrus: Expedition to the Shrinking Chukchi Sea Ice (video)

This twelve minute video from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) starts with the biologists describing some of the many endearing qualities of walruses,  explaining how important sea ice is to the animals and why the decline of that ice is so disruptive and threatening -- not just to the walruses but for the people of the region.  The second half of the video shows how USGS biologists use satellite radio tags to track the movement and behavior of the walruses. "The information identifies areas of special importance to walruses during sparse summer sea ice and as human presence increases in the region from oil drilling and activities such as shipping and tourism now possible with less ice," says the USGS. In addition to the video, we provide a transcript.

24 Hours of Reality: The Dirty Weather Report

From an 8 pm EST kickoff on Wednesday 14 November to a 7-8 pm finale on Thursday 15 November 2012, watch the live online broadcast of 24 Hours of Reality on climate disruption and its affect on all of us. The event spotlights every region of the globe across all 24 time zones, highlighting different impacts and solutions every hour from a variety of voices—musicians, comedians, experts, every day people.

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