Slowing Climate Change (General) + Agriculture + Energy Supply + Forests + Geoengineering + Industry + Residential and Commercial Buildings + Transportation + Waste Management

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In Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Group Issues Report Saying Observed Climate Change Impacts "Have Little National Significance"

In 2009, a publicly funded assessment of the impacts of climate change, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, warned in its key findings that "coastal areas are at increasing risk from sea-level rise and storm surge." Now, just days after "Frankenstorm" Sandy pushed the most destructive and costly storm surge on record for the U.S. mid-Atlantic into the region's heavily populated coastal areas, the libertarian Cato Institute is treating Americans to a Halloween trick. It released today (31 October 2012) a slick study masquerading as an updated "Addendum" to the Federal report. In its key findings, Cato entirely drops any mention of storm surges and says the "[i]mpacts of observed climate change have little national significance."

Video: From Rooftop to Alleyway, Chicago Fights Extreme Urban Heat With Greener Ideas

As the planet warms, heat waves are becoming more frequent and severe.  The problem is compounded in cities by the "urban heat island" effect -- the tendency for cities to be much warmer than the surrounding countryside.  In this 10 minute video, PBS Newshour reports on Chicago's efforts to cool the city down and dampen the rising need for air conditioning.  

Lincoln Forum: “Climate Change in Nebraska”

Event Date: 
Saturday, October 6, 2012 - 9:00am - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Lincoln, Nebraska

An event for the general public to learn more from scientists about how climate change will affect Nebraska, sponsored by Missouri Valley Sierra Club, Physicians for Social Responsibility, the Nebraska League of Conservation Voters, and the Izaak Walton League.

In Alaska's Chukchi Sea: Shell Resumes Offshore Drilling as Nearby Walruses are Forced Onshore

The story of this year's Arctic sea ice decline did not end on 16 September when the sea ice reached its official minimum extent for the Arctic overall. The decline has continued in the Chukchi Sea -- with momentous consequences. While the National Ice Center indicated that a large "marginal ice zone" was present north of Alaska on 16 September, that zone continued to decline and on 24 September the marginal ice zone had been entirely replaced by open water.

Video: Tucson (Arizona) Citizens Talk about Climate Change and their "Power to Prepare Tucson" Summit

In this video, the citizens of Tucson, Arizona, talk about the challenges climate change poses for the city and about the "Power to Prepare Tucson" summit the city held earlier this year (2012) to address those challenges. The event, was a central part of Tucson's participation in WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge, a competition among U.S. cities to prepare for climate change and reduce carbon footprints.  

Video introduction to WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge

A short video introduction to WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge, a competition among U.S. cities to prepare for climate change and to shift away from fossil fuels.

Science Museum's Climate Change Photo Challenge

Do you have a good photo illustrating some action your community is taking to prepare for changing weather patterns, rising sea levels or other emerging impacts of climate change?  How about a photo showing ways in which your community is helping to reduce its carbon footprint?  If so, consider submitting it (by August 15, by 2 p.m. EDT!) to the Climate Change Photo Challenge of the Koshland Science Museum of the National Academy of Sciences.

To Politicians Napping on the Fireline: Wake Up, Smell the Smoke and Act on Climate Change

Extraordinary wildfire conditions are among the indications that climate change is well underway in the Southwestern U.S.  Cities and towns in the region are responding, showing leadership where the federal government does not.  Alas, many of our elected representatives in Washington are napping on the fireline. They need to wake up, smell the smoke and take climate change seriously.

Colorado Congressman Wants Federal Support for Fossil Fuels -- and for Coping with their Climate Impacts

Congressman Cory Gardner, a freshman Republican representing a large part of northern and eastern Colorado, is a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Gardner along with the majority of committee members, supports expanded U.S. production of fossil fuels. Pollutants released by those fuels are accumulating in the atmosphere and making his state and the rest of the Southwest hotter and drier. Gardner and many of his colleagues deny that fossil fuel use seriously threatens climate, and oppose regulation of greenhouse gases (GHGs) under the Clean Air Act. While they promote policies that undermine Federal efforts to address the threat of climate change, their home states and districts are experiencing weather extremes -- and impacts -- that foreshadow the ultimate consequences of such policies.  The High Park Fire in Gardner's district has torched 87,284 acres, burned 257 houses and has cost $33.5 million to suppress. To the south, in Colorado Springs, the Waldo Canyon Fire destroyed 346 homes this week, and threatens over 20,000 more homes.

WWF Webinar Introduces U.S. City Officials to Earth Hour City Challenge (video)

WWF on 3 May 2012 held its first webinar about the Earth Hour City Challenge, a competition among cities to prepare for climate change and promote renewable energy. Keya Chatterjee, Deputy Director of the Climate Change Program at WWF discussed how the City Challenge started and what benefits are available to participating cities and counties. Leslie Ethen, Director of the City of Tucson (Arizona) Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development, described how the City Challenge generated momentum for the city's climate and sustainability initiatives.

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