Mekong

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Tibetan Plateau Feels the Impacts of Climate Change

Within the past 15 years, the Tibetan plateau has seen shifts in the timing of precipitation and the onset of spring, as well as the volume of frozen rain and snow that builds up over each winter.  The impacts are rippling across the region's communities and ecosystems.  Adaptation choices for the plateau are both difficult and limited in the face of such extremely rapid environmental change.

Adaptation support key to a climate deal at Copenhagen

The world's wealthy nations have a long way to go on the key negotiating element of climate change adaptation at Copenhagen, WWF warned today, as it presented an outline of what adaptation measures should be included in a new climate treaty [PDF], together with case studies [PDF] of its work on climate change adaptation around the globe.

Climate change in the Mekong

In a new report, The Greater Mekong and Climate Change, WWF assesses the impacts of climate change on the region that includes Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and southwest China.

The Greater Mekong & Climate Change Report

Temperatures are predicted to rise between 2ºC to 4ºC in the Greater Mekong region by the end of the century negatively affecting the area which is one of the most biologically diverse in the world.

163 new species now at risk of extinction due to climate change

A new report launched by World Wildlife Fund (WWF), titled Close Encounters, states that the 163 newly discovered species in the Greater Mekong region last year are now at risk of extinction due to climate change.

Himalayas are climate change hotspot

Alterations in Himalayan ecosystems from climate change could dramatically alter the lives of over 700 million people that live in this region.

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