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WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Federal Report: Rising Seas and Climate Change Threaten Coasts, as Local Governments Shoulder Much of the Preparedness Burden

A new report on climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability in coastal areas of the U.S. warns that coping with sea level rise and coastal disruption "will be a challenge for coastal economies that contributed $8.3 trillion to the GDP in 2011." It says that local governments will have to shoulder much of the burden of "making the critical, basic land-use and public investment decisions and ...working with community stakeholder groups to implement adaptive measures on the ground."

Rising ocean temperatures and acidity may prove a deadly one-two punch for the world’s corals

A recent experiment by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has revealed just how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide will deliver a one-two punch to coral reefs in coming decades, potentially knocking them out by preventing growth in juvenile corals.

Another Extreme Drought Hits the Amazon and Raises Climate Change Concerns

The Amazon region is experiencing the third extreme drought in a dozen years -- and it may turn out to be the worst on record. The droughts coupled with recent research findings, suggest that rising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases will rapidly increase the frequency and severity of droughts in the region. The implications for people,  biodiversity and climate are ominous.

Sea Surface Temperatures in Tropical North Atlantic Rise to Record Levels in 2010, With Impacts from the Amazon to Canada

Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Tropical North Atlantic are rising over the long term, driven in part by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases. High and in some areas record SSTs in the region throughout 2010 are largely responsible for one of the worst coral bleaching episodes on record in the Caribbean, are a principal contributor to one of the most active hurricane seasons on record, and are likely a key factor behind the second extreme drought in the Amazon in 5 years.

UN Report Calls for "Immediate Global Response" to Save Coral Reefs from Rising Carbon Emissions

"Coral reefs are facing unprecedented impacts due to climate change, through a combination of threats including damage from increasingly severe tropical cyclones, more frequent temperature-induced coral bleaching events and diminished structural integrity due to ocean acidification," says a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Videos: The Death of the Oceans?

In this new documentary broadcast by BBC Two as part of its Horizon series, Sir David Attenborough takes the audience around the world to meet scientists studying our impacts on the oceans, from climate change and ocean acidification to over-fishing.

Scientists Report One of the Worst Coral Bleaching Events on Record in Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean

“It is certainly the worst coral die-off we have seen since 1998.  It may prove to be the worst such event known to science,” says Dr Andrew Baird of the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.

Ocean Acidification Featured in New Video and Lesson Plan

Dr Heidi Cullen of Climate Central explains in this video featuring Otis Brown of Miami University that more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans.  That is making the oceans more acidic and less hospitablef or corals and many other important organisms.  A new lesson plan for Grades 5 through 8 explores the issue further.

From the Poles to the Equator, High Sea Surface Temperatures are Taking a Toll

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported yesterday (15 September 2010) that sea surface temperatures thus far in 2010 are the second warmest on record.  The observed impacts range from a near-record low sea-ice extent in the Arctic to a hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season and damage to coral reefs.

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