General Oceans

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WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Join Us for 24 Hours of Reality

This year has given way to record breaking weather extremes. From the Midwest blizzard that shut down Chicago to the Mississippi flooding, Texas drought and Hurricane Irene. It’s been a record year for billion-dollar disasters and these extremes are projected to become more frequent as the climate changes. On Wednesday September 14th (2011) the Climate Reality Project is showing 24 hours of reality on the climate crisis. While 2011 has provided a window into the extreme weather of the future, the event is showing the world in every time zone the reality of climate change, connecting the dots between extreme weather and climate change.

Rising ocean temperatures and acidity may prove a deadly one-two punch for the world’s corals

A recent experiment by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has revealed just how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide will deliver a one-two punch to coral reefs in coming decades, potentially knocking them out by preventing growth in juvenile corals.

UN Report Calls for "Immediate Global Response" to Save Coral Reefs from Rising Carbon Emissions

"Coral reefs are facing unprecedented impacts due to climate change, through a combination of threats including damage from increasingly severe tropical cyclones, more frequent temperature-induced coral bleaching events and diminished structural integrity due to ocean acidification," says a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Videos: The Death of the Oceans?

In this new documentary broadcast by BBC Two as part of its Horizon series, Sir David Attenborough takes the audience around the world to meet scientists studying our impacts on the oceans, from climate change and ocean acidification to over-fishing.

Ocean Acidification Featured in New Video and Lesson Plan

Dr Heidi Cullen of Climate Central explains in this video featuring Otis Brown of Miami University that more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans.  That is making the oceans more acidic and less hospitablef or corals and many other important organisms.  A new lesson plan for Grades 5 through 8 explores the issue further.

From the Poles to the Equator, High Sea Surface Temperatures are Taking a Toll

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported yesterday (15 September 2010) that sea surface temperatures thus far in 2010 are the second warmest on record.  The observed impacts range from a near-record low sea-ice extent in the Arctic to a hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season and damage to coral reefs.

NOAA Joins NASA in Declaring that July 2010 was Warmest on Record for Northern Hemisphere

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released climate data for July 2010 confirming what NASA data separately found last week: it was the warmest July on record for the Northern Hemisphere. 

Northern Hemisphere Temperature Shatters July Record

NASA released data today (11 August 2010) showing that the average surface temperature in July 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere shattered the previous record set in 2005.  Globally, the year to date is the warmest on record (i.e. in 131 years).

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