United States

Video (PBS): How Cities Should Prepare for Climate Disruption and Sea Level Rise

Should cities be preparing for the consequences of climate disruption and rising sea levels?  As part of the PBS Newshour series on "Coping With Climate Change," Ray Suarez discusses the question with Joseph Romm of Center for American Progress and American Enterprise Institute's Kenneth Green.

Sandy's Wake-up Call: The Future Is Here Early

For the 50 million of us who stood in the path of Hurricane Sandy and the rest who watched its devastation, isn't it time to ask our leaders how we can avoid a future where Frankenstorms like Sandy become the new normal?  We need common-sense strategies to prepare our communities to withstand a future with rising seas and with storms, droughts and wildfires on steroids.  We also must quickly harness American ingenuity to build a world powered by carbon-free energy that will stop pumping steroids into our climate system and lessen future risks.  We must do both and Sandy has reminded us that there's no time to lose. The future is here, a little early.

In Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Group Issues Report Saying Observed Climate Change Impacts "Have Little National Significance"

In 2009, a publicly funded assessment of the impacts of climate change, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, warned in its key findings that "coastal areas are at increasing risk from sea-level rise and storm surge." Now, just days after "Frankenstorm" Sandy pushed the most destructive and costly storm surge on record for the U.S. mid-Atlantic into the region's heavily populated coastal areas, the libertarian Cato Institute is treating Americans to a Halloween trick. It released today (31 October 2012) a slick study masquerading as an updated "Addendum" to the Federal report. In its key findings, Cato entirely drops any mention of storm surges and says the "[i]mpacts of observed climate change have little national significance."

Great Lakes Climate Symposium 2012

Event Date: 
Tuesday, October 30, 2012 (All day)
Event Location: 
Ann Arbor, MI

Learn about the latest research on climate change in the Great Lakes region from a team of researchers that contributed a set of white papers on Midwest climate impacts to the Federal government's National Climate Assessment.

Federal Report: Rising Seas and Climate Change Threaten Coasts, as Local Governments Shoulder Much of the Preparedness Burden

A new report on climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability in coastal areas of the U.S. warns that coping with sea level rise and coastal disruption "will be a challenge for coastal economies that contributed $8.3 trillion to the GDP in 2011." It says that local governments will have to shoulder much of the burden of "making the critical, basic land-use and public investment decisions and ...working with community stakeholder groups to implement adaptive measures on the ground."

13th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Disasters and Environment -- Science, Preparedness, and Resilience

Event Date: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, January 17, 2013 (All day)
Event Location: 
Washington, DC

"On January 15-17, 2013, join over 1,200 leaders from the emergency response, scientific, policy, conservation, and business communities, as well as federal and local government officials, to address themes such as cascading disasters, the intersection of the built and natural environments, disasters as mechanisms of ecosystem change, rethinking recovery and expanding the vision of mitigation, human behavior and its consequences and "No Regrets" resilience."

Video: From Rooftop to Alleyway, Chicago Fights Extreme Urban Heat With Greener Ideas

As the planet warms, heat waves are becoming more frequent and severe.  The problem is compounded in cities by the "urban heat island" effect -- the tendency for cities to be much warmer than the surrounding countryside.  In this 10 minute video, PBS Newshour reports on Chicago's efforts to cool the city down and dampen the rising need for air conditioning.  

In Film "Chasing Ice," See How Climate Change Puts the Planet on a Slippery Slope (video)

Whether or not we take action to slow climate change and prepare for its impacts depends a lot on compelling images of what is happening to the planet around us, and on visualizing alternative futures. Few images can be as iconic, compelling and symbolic of climate change than the melting and disintegration of the world's ice sheets and glaciers. In the movie Chasing Ice, to be released on 9 November 2012, audiences will follow photographer James Balog and his crew in their determined efforts to capture those images in some of the harshest, most isolated -- and most beautiful -- areas of the planet.

With Inadequate Sea Ice North of Alaska, Walruses Haul-Out Along Russian Coast

We reported last week (26 September 2012), that sea ice in the Chukchi Sea north of Alaska had declined to the point where the National Ice Center had characterized an area preferred by walruses (Hanna Shoal) as open water. Without the sea ice they needed to rest on, walruses were headed ashore in search of a suitable area of coastal land where they could "haul out." We and others expected large numbers of walruses to haul out in the area of Point Lay, Alaska, where they have hauled out in recent years. But most of the walruses instead opted to continue swimming far to the West, to haul out in the vicinity of Russia's Cape Serdtse-Kamen -- joining other walruses already hauled out there. Though we cannot yet confirm that large numbers of walruses are hauling out at the remote cape, that certainly was the case last year. By mid-October 2011, an estimated (and astounding) 100,000 walruses from both the U.S. and Russian sides of the Chukchi, had hauled out there.

Make Tracks for Walruses: Second Annual WCS Run for the Wild

Event Date: 
Saturday, October 6, 2012 - 8:00am
Event Location: 
New York City

Sponsored by the Wildlife Conservation Society at the New York Aquarium at Coney Island to support its work to save walruses.  Check-in and registration opens at 7:00 a.m. Runners start at 8:00 a.m. and the Family Fun Run/Walk starts at 8:45 a.m.  See registration and other information at the Run for the Wild Web site.

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