Great Plains

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

In Film "Chasing Ice," See How Climate Change Puts the Planet on a Slippery Slope (video)

Whether or not we take action to slow climate change and prepare for its impacts depends a lot on compelling images of what is happening to the planet around us, and on visualizing alternative futures. Few images can be as iconic, compelling and symbolic of climate change than the melting and disintegration of the world's ice sheets and glaciers. In the movie Chasing Ice, to be released on 9 November 2012, audiences will follow photographer James Balog and his crew in their determined efforts to capture those images in some of the harshest, most isolated -- and most beautiful -- areas of the planet.

Lincoln Forum: “Climate Change in Nebraska”

Event Date: 
Saturday, October 6, 2012 - 9:00am - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Lincoln, Nebraska

An event for the general public to learn more from scientists about how climate change will affect Nebraska, sponsored by Missouri Valley Sierra Club, Physicians for Social Responsibility, the Nebraska League of Conservation Voters, and the Izaak Walton League.

Omaha Forum: “Climate Change in Nebraska”

Event Date: 
Saturday, October 20, 2012 - 9:00am - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Omaha, Nebraska

An event for the general public to learn more from scientists about how climate change will affect Nebraska, sponsored by Missouri Valley Sierra Club, Physicians for Social Responsibility, the Nebraska League of Conservation Voters, and the Izaak Walton League.

Video introduction to WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge

A short video introduction to WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge, a competition among U.S. cities to prepare for climate change and to shift away from fossil fuels.

A Tale of Two Droughts: As in '88, Will 2012's Weather Extremes Push Climate Change Higher on the National Agenda?

In 1988, America faced an extraordinary summer heat wave and an extensive drought that  helped to propel climate change into national politics.   Republican presidential candidate George H.W. Bush said that year: "Those who think we are powerless to do anything about the 'greenhouse effect' are forgetting about the 'White House effect.'''  In 2012, even more of the country has been afflicted by drought; and it is another election year.  Might we again hear of the "White House effect" this August? If there is to be any chance for a meaningful national conversation about climate change after the election, we have to hope that the candidates candidly address the issue before the election.

WWF Webinar Introduces U.S. City Officials to Earth Hour City Challenge (video)

WWF on 3 May 2012 held its first webinar about the Earth Hour City Challenge, a competition among cities to prepare for climate change and promote renewable energy. Keya Chatterjee, Deputy Director of the Climate Change Program at WWF discussed how the City Challenge started and what benefits are available to participating cities and counties. Leslie Ethen, Director of the City of Tucson (Arizona) Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development, described how the City Challenge generated momentum for the city's climate and sustainability initiatives.

IPCC Says Essential Actions Needed to Reduce Risks of Changing Climate Extremes

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) approved on Friday (18 Nov 2011) a report on preparing for weather and climate extremes. The report’s summary warns that a changing climate “can result in unprecedented extreme weather and climate events” and says that actions ranging “from incremental steps to transformational change are essential for reducing risk from climate extremes.” The U.S. this year has experienced a record fourteen weather-related disasters each in excess of a billion dollars – and many more disasters of lesser magnitudes. Yet the U.S. has no national climate change preparedness strategy; and Federal efforts to address the rising risks have been undermined through budget cuts and other means. Though seriously constrained by the lack of strong and unified leadership in Washington, communities and others around the country nevertheless are taking commonsense actions to address the emerging impacts of increasingly disruptive climate extremes.

White House Reports on Climate Change Adaptation, as Communities Face Rising Impacts Without National Strategy

The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on Friday (28 October 2011) released a second annual progress report from the government’s Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force.  Despite the significant progress summarized in "Federal Actions for a Climate Resilient Nation," the U.S. still has no national strategy for adapting to climate change, leaving America dangerously unprepared for climate conditions that are becoming more extreme and disruptive. With Washington (and the field of presidential candidates) largely AWOL in responding to climate change, the burden shifts to cities and towns across the country to face these growing extremes mostly on their own.  Fortunately, some communities and businesses around America  are beginning to prepare.  Unfortunately, those cities and businesses are the exception, not the rule.

Syndicate content