US - Federal Policy

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Our Collision Course with Climate Change: a "10" on the Torino scale

Today (31 May 2013), Asteroid 1998 QE2 will come within 3.6  million miles of the earth, making it a “0” (No Hazard) on the Torino Impact Hazard Scale.  And what is a 10 on the Torino scale?  That would be a situation where "a collision is certain, capable of causing global climatic catastrophe that may threaten the future of civilization as we know it, whether impacting land or ocean. Such events occur on average once per 100,000 years, or less often."  It sounds like the hazard we're facing after pushing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations beyond 400 parts per million (ppm). But there are at least three important differences. 

From Coast to Coast, Community Leaders Press Forward with Climate Preparedness Efforts

The White House announced yesterday (8 April 2013) the names of twelve “climate resilience leaders” who will be honored in a “Champions of Change” event on Thursday (11 April). “As we take action to reduce carbon pollution and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy, we must also take action to prepare for the impacts of climate change we are already seeing, including more frequent and severe extreme weather,”  said Nancy Sutley, Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.  The event comes just weeks after the World Wildlife Fund concluded its first annual Earth Hour City Challenge, during which Americans in 2,000 U.S. cities and counties challenged their mayors and city councils to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and to prepare for the disruptive impacts of climate change.

Obama Highlights Emerging Impacts of Climate Change, Calls for Energy Transformation and for Community Climate Preparedness

In his State of the Union address last night (12 February 2013), President Obama said that "for the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change."  He pledged to "come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy."  He said that "if Congress won’t act soon to protect future generations, I will." Lou Leonard, WWF’s head of climate change, responded: "It was encouraging to see President Obama connect the dots between extreme weather and dirty energy, and to be clear that he won't wait for Congress to act.  Cities and towns on the front lines of extreme weather can't afford more excuses from Washington."

In his Second Inaugural Address, President Obama says "We will respond to the threat of climate change"

In his second inaugural address, President Barack Obama said today (21 January 2013) at the Capitol in Washington, DC: "We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations."  Lou Leonard, head of WWF’s climate change program, is heartened by the President's statement, saying that "it is an important first step for using the power of the Presidency to spur a practical national conversation on climate change. The importance of the President regularly raising his voice on this issue cannot be overstated. But a sustained national conversation isn’t enough. The President should lay out the steps he can and will take to clean up our energy system, help communities prepare for climate disruption and encourage the rest of the world to ramp up action."

With High Hopes for the Future: Obama's Moral Imperative to Address Climate Change

"I wager," says WWF President and CEO Carter Roberts in this Huffington Post piece, "that like Lincoln, President Obama will be remembered most for what he does to address the existential threat that history has presented on his watch: the breakdown of our planet's natural systems upon which all life depends, and specifically human-caused climate change."

Majority of world’s largest companies shifting to clean energy

New study shows nearly 60 percent of world’s largest companies have renewable energy or greenhouse gas reduction commitments, citing strong business case.

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminar with Katharine Hayhoe: The Facts are Not Enough –Overcoming Public Deadlock on Climate Change

Event Date: 
Thursday, December 13, 2012 (All day)
Event Location: 
WWF, 1250 24th St NW, Washington, D.C

Mounting scientific evidence documents the emerging consequences and future risks of climate change for the United States. As the scientific evidence builds, however, public opinion in the U.S. remains sharply divided. Much of the disagreement comes from political and religious conservatives. Why is climate change so polarizing to these communities? What makes it so hard to comprehend and accept? Join  Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, Director of the Climate Science Center and Associate Professor at Texas Tech University in a seminar where she will identify common barriers to accepting the reality of climate change and explore ways to move past these obstacles towards action.

Statement on the Re-election of President Obama

WWF congratulates President Obama on his re-election and looks forward to working with him and his administration over the next four years to tackle the greatest threats to our planet, and the people and other creatures that call it home.  An agenda focused on common-sense solutions to prepare for present and future climate impacts, while transitioning our economy to clean, renewable energy will command support across the political spectrum. At the same time, President Obama now has the political space to put international efforts to secure a global climate treaty back on the right track.
 

Disaster resilience in America

Event Date: 
Friday, November 30, 2012 - 9:00am - 12:30pm
Event Location: 
Washington, DC

Building upon the recent National Academies report Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative, a series of National Research Council panel discussions featuring nationally recognized experts in disaster resilience will launch a national conversation that translates to resilience-building actions at the community, state, and national levels. 

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