General Policy

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminar with Katharine Hayhoe: The Facts are Not Enough –Overcoming Public Deadlock on Climate Change

Event Date: 
Thursday, December 13, 2012 (All day)
Event Location: 
WWF, 1250 24th St NW, Washington, D.C

Mounting scientific evidence documents the emerging consequences and future risks of climate change for the United States. As the scientific evidence builds, however, public opinion in the U.S. remains sharply divided. Much of the disagreement comes from political and religious conservatives. Why is climate change so polarizing to these communities? What makes it so hard to comprehend and accept? Join  Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, Director of the Climate Science Center and Associate Professor at Texas Tech University in a seminar where she will identify common barriers to accepting the reality of climate change and explore ways to move past these obstacles towards action.

13th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Disasters and Environment -- Science, Preparedness, and Resilience

Event Date: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, January 17, 2013 (All day)
Event Location: 
Washington, DC

"On January 15-17, 2013, join over 1,200 leaders from the emergency response, scientific, policy, conservation, and business communities, as well as federal and local government officials, to address themes such as cascading disasters, the intersection of the built and natural environments, disasters as mechanisms of ecosystem change, rethinking recovery and expanding the vision of mitigation, human behavior and its consequences and "No Regrets" resilience."

Brazilian Legislation Threatens to Accelerate Amazon Deforestation; Presidential Veto Urgently Required

Brazil's Senate voted on Wednesday (7 December 2011) to make changes to the country's forest law.  If approved by Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, the law would threaten an area larger than the state of Texas -- and one of the world's treasured natural areas.  The consequences would be felt all over the world, as a significant amount of CO2 could be released to the atmosphere.  Brazil's ambitious efforts to slow climate change by reducing its greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation would be severely undermined.  Sign our petition and join more than 1.5 million Brazilians in urging Brazil's President to veto the bill.

Shipping Industry Should Do Its Fair Share on Climate Change

International shipping is a major and rapidly growing source of greenhouse gas emissions. It’s responsible for 3 percent of global emissions—twice that of Australia. Since it’s an international sector, its pollution is not attributed to any country and does not fall under international agreements like the Kyoto Protocol. However, this presents an opportunity to both reduce global emissions and raise critical revenue for developing countries to prepare for climate impacts. Recent reports published for the G20 from Bill Gates, the World Bank and IMF support raising critical revenue for developing countries through shipping. These reports substantiate WWF and Oxfam’s recent proposal, offering a path forward on how to incorporate this industry into a global solution for addressing climate change.

White House Reports on Climate Change Adaptation, as Communities Face Rising Impacts Without National Strategy

The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on Friday (28 October 2011) released a second annual progress report from the government’s Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force.  Despite the significant progress summarized in "Federal Actions for a Climate Resilient Nation," the U.S. still has no national strategy for adapting to climate change, leaving America dangerously unprepared for climate conditions that are becoming more extreme and disruptive. With Washington (and the field of presidential candidates) largely AWOL in responding to climate change, the burden shifts to cities and towns across the country to face these growing extremes mostly on their own.  Fortunately, some communities and businesses around America  are beginning to prepare.  Unfortunately, those cities and businesses are the exception, not the rule.

Join Us for 24 Hours of Reality

This year has given way to record breaking weather extremes. From the Midwest blizzard that shut down Chicago to the Mississippi flooding, Texas drought and Hurricane Irene. It’s been a record year for billion-dollar disasters and these extremes are projected to become more frequent as the climate changes. On Wednesday September 14th (2011) the Climate Reality Project is showing 24 hours of reality on the climate crisis. While 2011 has provided a window into the extreme weather of the future, the event is showing the world in every time zone the reality of climate change, connecting the dots between extreme weather and climate change.

As the Costs of Extreme Weather Rise, Americans Cannot Afford Denial

As costly climate extremes exact a mounting toll on the U.S. economy and further strain the Federal budget, the path forward is clear: acknowledge and better understand the growing threat posed by climate variability and change, do what we can to slow climate change by sharply reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improve our weather forecasts and climate projections, and prepare ourselves for future impacts. Yet ideologues are pushing an opposite agenda: deny climate change and systematically eviscerate the Federal government’s efforts to address it. They are leaving Americans dangerously unprepared, saddled with the rapidly mounting costs of increasingly extreme weather. 

House drying up funding for weather preparedness (Repost)

This is a repost of an op-ed piece published in the San Francisco Chronicle (11 Aug. 2011). As the price tag for extreme weather increases, the U.S. House of Representatives ignores the problem and is attempting to make it worse by trying to cut important funding for climate change and preparedness.

Governor Christie Stops New Jersey from Addressing Climate Change, Ignoring the Perils to his State

New Jersey Governor, Chris Christie, is pulling his state out of the only system currently operating in America that makes polluters pay for their carbon pollution that causes climate change. Bob Litterman, a New Jersey resident, economic and risk expert and WWF board member, discusses the governor’s irresponsible actions and the consequences New Jersey faces if carbon emissions and climate change are not adequately addressed. 

Syndicate content