Ocean Acidification (General)

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Scientists Release Findings of Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment, Warn of Emerging Impacts on Vital Commercial Fisheries

An international group of scientists on Monday (6 May 2013) released the findings of their Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment.  The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), which commissioned the research, said in a press release that the Arctic Ocean "is rapidly accumulating carbon dioxide (CO2) leading to increased ocean acidification...This ongoing change impacts Arctic marine ecosystems already affected by rising temperatures and melting sea ice."   AMAP warns that "Arctic Ocean acidification has the potential to affect both commercial fisheries that are important to northern economies, and marine resources that are used by Arctic indigenous people." 

Video and Transcript: Senators Sheldon Whitehouse and Al Franken Team Up for a Colloquy on Climate Change

Yesterday evening (14 December 2011) Senators Sheldon Whitehouse (Democrat, Rhode Island) and Al Franken (Democrat, Minnesota) spent an hour on the floor of the U.S. Senate repudiating climate change denialists and arguing for serious U.S. action on climate chhange.  We provide the video and transcript.

White House Reports on Climate Change Adaptation, as Communities Face Rising Impacts Without National Strategy

The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on Friday (28 October 2011) released a second annual progress report from the government’s Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force.  Despite the significant progress summarized in "Federal Actions for a Climate Resilient Nation," the U.S. still has no national strategy for adapting to climate change, leaving America dangerously unprepared for climate conditions that are becoming more extreme and disruptive. With Washington (and the field of presidential candidates) largely AWOL in responding to climate change, the burden shifts to cities and towns across the country to face these growing extremes mostly on their own.  Fortunately, some communities and businesses around America  are beginning to prepare.  Unfortunately, those cities and businesses are the exception, not the rule.

Rising ocean temperatures and acidity may prove a deadly one-two punch for the world’s corals

A recent experiment by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has revealed just how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide will deliver a one-two punch to coral reefs in coming decades, potentially knocking them out by preventing growth in juvenile corals.

U.S. Proposes to Categorize Ringed and Bearded Seals as "Threatened"

The U.S. government proposed yesterday (3 Dec 2010) to list four subspecies of ringed seals and two populations of bearded seals -- all in the Arctic region -- as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.  The primary threats cited in the proposals are rapid warming of the Arctic combined with ocean acidification -- both driven by rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.  "We hope that governments meeting for climate negotiations right now in Cancun are paying attention,” says Geoff York, WWF arctic species expert.

UN Report Calls for "Immediate Global Response" to Save Coral Reefs from Rising Carbon Emissions

"Coral reefs are facing unprecedented impacts due to climate change, through a combination of threats including damage from increasingly severe tropical cyclones, more frequent temperature-induced coral bleaching events and diminished structural integrity due to ocean acidification," says a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Videos: The Death of the Oceans?

In this new documentary broadcast by BBC Two as part of its Horizon series, Sir David Attenborough takes the audience around the world to meet scientists studying our impacts on the oceans, from climate change and ocean acidification to over-fishing.

Ocean Acidification Featured in New Video and Lesson Plan

Dr Heidi Cullen of Climate Central explains in this video featuring Otis Brown of Miami University that more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans.  That is making the oceans more acidic and less hospitablef or corals and many other important organisms.  A new lesson plan for Grades 5 through 8 explores the issue further.

Video: Climate Change, Ocean Acidification and the Arctic Ocean

With the extent of Arctic sea ice presently at the second lowest level on record for the date, we are reminded of the growing threats to the Arctic ocean posed by rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.  Here is nice video overview from actor Ted Danson and the organization, Oceana. 

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