• warning: preg_match() [function.preg-match]: Compilation failed: disallowed Unicode code point (>= 0xd800 && <= 0xdfff) at offset 1811 in /home/wwfblogs/public_html/climate/modules/ctools/includes/cleanstring.inc on line 157.
  • warning: preg_match() [function.preg-match]: Compilation failed: disallowed Unicode code point (>= 0xd800 && <= 0xdfff) at offset 1811 in /home/wwfblogs/public_html/climate/modules/ctools/includes/cleanstring.inc on line 157.
  • warning: preg_match() [function.preg-match]: Compilation failed: disallowed Unicode code point (>= 0xd800 && <= 0xdfff) at offset 1811 in /home/wwfblogs/public_html/climate/modules/ctools/includes/cleanstring.inc on line 157.
  • warning: preg_match() [function.preg-match]: Compilation failed: disallowed Unicode code point (>= 0xd800 && <= 0xdfff) at offset 1811 in /home/wwfblogs/public_html/climate/modules/ctools/includes/cleanstring.inc on line 157.

WWF Climate Blog Has Moved to New Location

The WWF climate blog now is located at a different Web address: worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.  All posts since May 2013 are at that location, while older posts will remain archived on this site.  The new site will have a single RSS feed at worldwildlife.org/blogs/wwf-climate-blog.rss.

Our Collision Course with Climate Change: a "10" on the Torino scale

Today (31 May 2013), Asteroid 1998 QE2 will come within 3.6  million miles of the earth, making it a “0” (No Hazard) on the Torino Impact Hazard Scale.  And what is a 10 on the Torino scale?  That would be a situation where "a collision is certain, capable of causing global climatic catastrophe that may threaten the future of civilization as we know it, whether impacting land or ocean. Such events occur on average once per 100,000 years, or less often."  It sounds like the hazard we're facing after pushing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations beyond 400 parts per million (ppm). But there are at least three important differences. 

Event on 6 June 2013: "Going to Extremes: The Alarming Science Behind Climate Change’s Increasingly Wild Weather"

Join us for a joint Climate Desk Live and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) event moderated by Chris Mooney featuring Stu Ostro, Senior Director of Weather Communications at the Weather Channel; and Jennifer Francis, Research Professor, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

Video: Extreme weather patterns and the possible role of climate change

Face the Nation (CBS) today (26 May 2013) features WFOR's Chief Meteorologist David Bernard, Climate Central's Chief Climatologist Heidi Cullen, TIME Magazine's Jeffrey Kluger and American Meteorological Society President Marshall Shepherd discussing recent extreme weather events, the upcoming hurricane season (starting 1 June), and the role of climate change in recent climate extremes.

Iconic Image: Longest-Running Measurement of Atmospheric CO2 Rises to Highest Daily Value on Record on 16 May 2013

Over the last week, both the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (University of California, San Diego) reported that the daily average concentration of carbon dioxide measured from Mauna Loa, Hawaii surpassed the historic milestone of 400.00 parts per million. Today Scripps reports that on Thursday (16 May), concentrations rose even higher.  The screenshot of the Scripps "Keeling Curve" Web site showing "400.27 ppm" and the curve of rapidly rising concentrations since 1958 merits to be among the iconic images of this era of climate disruption.

New WWF web tool maps Arctic nature and activities

As Arctic Council Ministers prepare to meet to outline priorities for the Council’s next two years, WWF has released a mapping tool to help inform those priorities, ArkGIS.

U.S. Unveils Arctic Strategy while Announcing that Atmospheric Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide Have Surpassed Historic Level

The White House on Friday (10 May 2013) released a National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that daily average atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) had on 9 May surpassed for the first time on record 400.00 parts per million (ppm) at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The rise in CO2 concentrations, largely driven by the burning of coal, oil and natural gas, is rapidly warming the Arctic.  The strategy acknowledges that “the current warming trend is unlike anything previously recorded” and that “there may be potentially profound environmental consequences of continued ocean warming and Arctic ice melt.” The document recognizes the Administration’s “global objective of combating the climatic changes that are driving these environmental conditions.” But the strategy also invokes U.S. security interests to argue that that “[c]ontinuing to responsibly develop Arctic oil and gas resources aligns with the United States `all of the above’ approach to developing new domestic energy sources.” In the absence of a U.S. low-carbon development strategy, is not clear how the U.S. ultimately will reconcile expanded fossil fuel production in the region with its commitment to combat climate change.

Study Predicts Dramatic Decline in Plants and Animals Unless Greenhouse Gas Emissions are Sharply Reduced

An international team of researchers reported today (Sunday 12 May 2013) in the journal Nature Climate Change, that the climate disruption from rapidly rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could result in a dramatic decline in more than one half of the world’s common plants and one third of the animals by the end of the century.  “Our research predicts that climate change will greatly reduce the diversity of even very common species found in most parts of the world,” said Dr Rachel Warren, leader of the study from the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom. “This loss of global-scale biodiversity would significantly impoverish the biosphere and the ecosystem services it provides.”  She said the loss could be prevented with “swift action to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gases.”

Scientists Release Findings of Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment, Warn of Emerging Impacts on Vital Commercial Fisheries

An international group of scientists on Monday (6 May 2013) released the findings of their Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment.  The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), which commissioned the research, said in a press release that the Arctic Ocean "is rapidly accumulating carbon dioxide (CO2) leading to increased ocean acidification...This ongoing change impacts Arctic marine ecosystems already affected by rising temperatures and melting sea ice."   AMAP warns that "Arctic Ocean acidification has the potential to affect both commercial fisheries that are important to northern economies, and marine resources that are used by Arctic indigenous people." 

WWF Invites Cities in 15 Countries to Participate in Earth Hour City Challenge 2014

From May through October 2013, cities in 15 countries can register for the next annual round of WWF's Earth Hour City Challenge.  The challenge will highlight and reward cities that aggressively and creatively address climate change.  An international jury will evaluate the actions being taken by each city, and in March 2014, the city with the highest overall score will be awarded the title "Global Earth Hour Capital."  A national Earth Hour Capital also will be named in each participating country.

Syndicate content